Tour d’Afrique 2013 by Laura Holms by Laura Holms: Sports & Adventure | Blurb Books

laurabook

Tour d’Afrique 2013 by Laura Holms by Laura Holms: Sports & Adventure | Blurb Books.

On January 11, 2013, exactly 1 year ago today, the 2013 Tour d’Afrique began in Cairo.

A couple of weeks ago, my sister Laura surprised me by giving me a book for Christmas that compiles all of my blogs from the ride plus a collection of photos she gathered from other riders.

It looks great and brings back many good memories.

You can have a look at it and order it you wish by going to:http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/invited/00b0ee2f7acef00d2b7b2e686e5bd9690b8ec534

Yesterday the 2014 Tour d’Afrique riders left from Khartoum. I hope they enjoy their ride as much as the 2013 crew did.

Fundraising Update – $47,000 Raised – Almost There

Donations to the Cycle for Sickle Cell Campaign to raise money for the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania to establish a day treatment centre, have continued to come in over the last couple of weeks since the end of the Tour d’Afrique.

A corporate donor, who wishes to remain anonymous, has just donated $15,000 to the campaign. This brings our total raised to almost $47,000. We don’t have far to go now.

The Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania has now identified a site for the day treatment centre. The money raised to date now makes it possible to begin negotiations. Exciting times.

The Foundation is planning to hold a press conference on World Sickle Cell Day, June 19, to continue to raise awareness. This would be a great day to hit our target.

Thanks  to everyone who has contributed!

Alan

To contribute

Click on the Sickle Cell logo under ‘donate here’ – this will take you to paypal

Go into your paypal account

Choose ‘send money’

Enter my email address: alan@taylerknight.co.uk

Tick ‘I’m sending money to family or friends’

Click continue

Great photos of the Tour stage by stage

John Chevis has just been uploading hundreds of great pictures of the tour, stage by stage, on his facebook page.

 

Have a look:  http://www.facebook.com/john.chevis.3

World Sickle Cell Day, June 19, 2013

Facebook.

And . . . still accpeting donations

To make a donation to the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania and Cycle for Sickle Cell

Click on the Sickle logo under ‘donate here’ – this will take you to paypal

Go into your paypal account

Choose ‘send money’

Enter my email address: alan@taylerknight.co.uk

Tick ‘I’m sending money to family or friends’

Click continue

Cheers,

Alan

Coda to TdA – Kili2Coast

The guys I cycle with in the mornings in Dar are doing an off-road ride from Mt Kilimanjaro to the Indian Ocean the first week of September. I couldn’t let them go alone so I have decided to join them. The ride looks like this:

  Distance Ascent
Day 1 135km 890m
Day 2 132km 3,684m
Day 3 91km 1,351m
Day 4 135km 2,270m
Day 5 79km 570m
Total 572km 8,765m

Day 2 will definitely test us. That’s a lot of climbing.

I won’t take the Croix de Fer on this ride. I have arranged to borrow a full suspension mountain bike.

Bike Review – Genesis Croix de Fer, 2013

What the bike had to put up with

The 12,000 km of the 2013 Tour d’Afrique, bike race from Cairo to Cape Town, about 25% of which was off road.

The Frame

The frame is made of Reynolds 725 steel. I am 1m73 and I used the 54cm frame.  The geometry was great. I was very comfortable on the bike after it was fit for me. I had no nagging aches or pains at any time. The paint chipped and abraded down to raw steel at several places. I chose steel because it can be repaired just about anywhere. But no repairs were needed. We were advised not to take carbon but several people did and not one of them had a problem. You can do some repairs to carbon anyway. Alloys seem to be less reliable. One alloy frame had a break and had to be scrapped.

The Wheels

The Croix de Fer comes with Alexrims XD-Lites. These were excellent. They took a real pounding and stood up to it. I had them trued twice but just as part of preventive maintenance. They never went really out of whack.

Tires

I used Schwalbe Marathon Plus – one set of 40mm and one set of 28mm They were superb. I had no punctures on the road. I did have one mysterious puncture in camp one evening. The bike came with 35mm Continental Cyclocross Race tires. I didn’t like these at all. I had several punctures while training before I left for the Tour. They are lightweight and thin and not suited to long rides in tough conditions. I didn’t even take them with me.

The Brakes

The bike came with Avid BB7 mechanical disk brakes with 160mm rotors. They worked very well. They are easy to adjust. The original brake pads disintegrated in wet and muddy conditions. I replaced them with resin pads, which held up better.  When the break pads disintegrated one of the rotors became very scarred. I replaced it.

Front and Rear Derailleur

The bike came with a Tiagra group set. Both derailleurs bent under the tough conditions and handling. I replaced both with 105 derailleurs. The front derailleur performed better, not much difference in the rear derailleur.

Front Chainrings and Rear Cassette

The bike came set up for racing, with two front chainrings (52/34) and an 11/26 ten speed rear cassette. I stayed with the front chainrings but soon switched to a 12/32 rear cassette. This helped on the hills but I still didn’t really have a granny gear. There was lots of sustained climbing of 12% and more. In future I would get three chainrings on the front.

Headset

The headset is a weak point on this bike. It is a cheap 1 1/8th threadless headset. Fine dust and sand gets in easily. I repacked it 4 times on Tour. It was not up to the very tough off road conditions. The headset became pitted and scarred. By the end, a couple of ball bearings had come out of one of the bearing races and the bearing race was bent and twisted.

Front Fork

The front for is a fixed fork. This made off road riding unpleasant. You could do it. But you suffered, especially your ulnar nerves. There is also not very much top clearance. The tube that goes into the headset extends down into the fork. I had to file this away to put my 40mm tires on. Even then I only had a few mm of clearance. In dry conditions this is ok. In wet and muddy conditions it means you are always stopping to clear away the mud that is acting like a break. In future I would fit a front suspension fork. Genesis should consider making this available as an option.

Rear Stays

Once again there is a problem of clearance. I could fit the 40mm tire but there was a real problem in muddy conditions.

Crank and Bottom Bracket

The Crank is Tiagra and came with SPD pedals. Both were fine. The bottom bracket is a standard English threaded one. The first one lasted only 5,000 km (about 1000km pre-Tour and the first 4000km of the Tour). I might have expected a bit more out of it.

Chain

I had no problems with the chains. There was a standard bit of stretch. I used three chains over the 12,000km. I changed it as part of regular maintenance rather than because of failure. I used Shimano 10 speed 105 replacement chains. I cleaned the chain and used dry lube very frequently.

Cables and Cable Housings

I had no problems with these but I did change them during the tour s part of routine maintenance.

Shifters

The bike came with Tiagra Brifters. They worked well. I had no problems at all. They were sometimes were infiltrated with sand and grit but were not difficult to clean.

Bars and Bar Tape

The bars fit me well and I liked them. The cushion in the bar tape didn’t last very long in wet conditions. The tape became hard and crusty. I soon replaced it with better bar tape with good cushioning – and in bright orange, with goes so much better with the black frame.

Seat and Seat Post

The seat was a Genesis own brand. I found it very comfortable and had no saddle sores for the 6000km+ that I rode it. Unfortunately it broke on tough off road conditions. I had to ride 26km to the finish line on sharp rocks corrugation and sand with no seat. By the end of the Tour the seat post was firmly rusted into the seat bar. I had put some lubricant in at the beginning but it obviously didn’t last and I hadn’t checked it over the course of the long ride. But this is now a real pain.